New Book: The Art of Taking Action: Lessons in Japanese Psychology

New Book: The Art of Taking Action: Lessons in Japanese Psychology

Many of us associate Eastern philosophy and religion with contemplative practices, such as meditation (zazen) or self-reflection (Naikan). We’ve borrowed from the contemplative East in order to integrate practices such as yoga, mindfulness or calligraphy into our lives. But there is also a foundation of Eastern wisdom directed towards ACTION. We tend to overlook these ideas because we may see our lives as already too active – too much to do and not enough time to do it. But the action principles that come from the East are different from those in the West. They emphasize a value system grounded in principles such as non-attachment, purpose, gratitude, interdependence, and coexisting with fear. Such principles are prominent in martial arts (Aikido, Kyudo), psychology (Morita therapy, Kaizen) and even religion (engaged Buddhism). The Art of Taking Action isn’t simply about keeping busy or checking things off your to-do list. It’s about choosing what to do, how to do it, and the development of character.

Naikan: Gratitude, Grace and the Japanese Art of Self-reflection by Gregg Krech

Naikan Book

I don’t know anything about consciousness. I just try to teach my students how to hear the birds sing.

- Shunryu Suzuki Roshi

Thirty Thousand Days: A Journal for Purposeful Living

Thirty Thousand Days Cover

Thirty Thousand Days: A Journal for Purposeful Living. Free for all ToDo Institute Members!